By: Kinsey Hunting

There’s a lot to process through with all of the drastic changes that have happened in our society over the last few weeks. This pandemic has created a globally shared trauma, the likes of which we’ve never seen before. All of us, across the entire globe, have to some degree experienced a traumatic loss because of this virus. Whether that be a loss of freedom to go out and be with people, a loss of a job, a loss of sanity (if you’ve got your kids at home), a loss of a major life event, a loss of safety, or a loss of a loved one. We’re all grieving something. I’ve got friends whose weddings have had to be cancelled. My brother will never get to walk in his college graduation. My friend lost her job in her school office because they sent everyone home. I feel extremely blessed that I’ve had to give up so little in comparison to so many others, but I still feel the weight of what this means for all of us.

I’ve found it difficult to let myself be sad about the things I have lost in the wake of this pandemic, though, because in all honestly, it all happened so quickly that I’ve become desensitized to these changes. I’m sure we can all attest in one way or another, that being forced to bounce back in such record time has made us feel a little apathetic about this sudden shift in lifestyle. Resiliency is not a bad thing by any means, but we don’t want to get so used to picking ourselves back up and moving forward that we forget to recognize where we are. There’s a reason why in Ecclesiastes 3:4, God says there is “a time to weep and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance…” Yes, we are called to bring hope to the hopeless, but we cannot neglect our own emotions in the process, because God clearly validates time spent weeping and mourning.

It’s ok if you don’t see the light clearly at the end of the tunnel every second of every day. Things are scary right now, and this virus is something that legitimately should garner fear. Things are sad and disappointing right now. We have lost all semblance of control and we don’t know when everything will go back to normal. So, allow yourself to feel your feelings, but don’t be consumed by them. Letting our fears and doubts and sadness eat us alive is how the enemy wins. But, just because you don’t feel ok, doesn’t mean you are far from God. We can rest in the comforting arms of the Father, knowing we can safely cast all of our anxieties on Him and that He promises to be close to the brokenhearted because He will always meet us where we’re at, no matter how high or low we’re feeling.

The Saddleback Parents Team
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